A two page interview with Grahame Bond by Mark Williams in the "Plug & Socket" section of IT (International Times) No. 65, September 26 - October 9, 1969. Grahame: Aleister Crowley BOND, related material.
A two page interview with Grahame Bond by Mark Williams in the "Plug & Socket" section of IT (International Times) No. 65, September 26 - October 9, 1969.
A two page interview with Grahame Bond by Mark Williams in the "Plug & Socket" section of IT (International Times) No. 65, September 26 - October 9, 1969.
A two page interview with Grahame Bond by Mark Williams in the "Plug & Socket" section of IT (International Times) No. 65, September 26 - October 9, 1969.

A two page interview with Grahame Bond by Mark Williams in the "Plug & Socket" section of IT (International Times) No. 65, September 26 - October 9, 1969.

London: IT / Knullar, 1969. First Edition. Broadsheet newspaper. 17.5 x 12.5 inches. A complete issue of IT (International Times) magazine, September 26 - October 9, 1969. The International Times was the quintessential London sixties underground newspaper. This issue includes a two page interview with Grahame Bond by Mark Williams in the "Plug & Socket" section of the paper (one page is opposite a full-page advert for The Beatles "Abbey Road"). Grahame Bond (1937–1974) was one of the founders of the English rhythm and blues boom of the 1960s, and one of the first musicians to openly and sincerely embrace Crowley's creed of Thelema and integrate it into his life and music. A musical innovator, he was respected by other musicians who acknowledged his influence, but nonetheless failed to achieve commercial success and struggled with illness, depression, and drugs. The interview was done shortly after Bond had returned from America where he had recorded a psychedelic rock album "Love is the Law" (1969) - the first album to be released under his own name. It was recorded in Los Angeles, where he had gone after the break-up of his last band (he had previously recorded as a member of the Don Rendell New Jazz Quartet and with the Graham Bond Organisation). In later life he became increasingly committed to the occult, and it is said that he came to view himself as Aleister Crowley's son (although whether this was intended literally or figuratively is not known). His death, at age 36 under a train at Finsbury Park underground station, London in 1974, is generally thought to have been suicide. Bond had a long history with IT, on 29 April 1967 he was one of dozens of performers and bands to play at the IT benefit concert, the 14 Hour Technicolor Dream, the audience of which included John Lennon. Folded in half horizontally, typical light wear you might expect on a 50 year old newspaper, still VG+ condition. Item #66581

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