An untitled single-leaf original holograph manuscript with poetry fragments on both sides. The first poem begins "Dull dirty décolleteés dilettante ..." A substantially revised version of the fragments was published in "The International" magazine, January 1918 as "A Poetry Society-in Madagascar?" Aleister CROWLEY.
An untitled single-leaf original holograph manuscript with poetry fragments on both sides. The first poem begins "Dull dirty décolleteés dilettante ..." A substantially revised version of the fragments was published in "The International" magazine, January 1918 as "A Poetry Society-in Madagascar?"

An untitled single-leaf original holograph manuscript with poetry fragments on both sides. The first poem begins "Dull dirty décolleteés dilettante ..." A substantially revised version of the fragments was published in "The International" magazine, January 1918 as "A Poetry Society-in Madagascar?"

ND ( ca. 1915 ). A collection of poetry and other fragments, written in manuscript in black ink on both sides of a single sheet of 11 x 8 1/2 inch buff office paper. The poetry fragments basically comprise five stanzas of mostly seemingly-unrelated verse. Crowley evidently revised them very heavily, removing, rearranging, and changing muc of the text, which he reduced to three stanzas which he published under the title "A Poetry Society - in Madagascar?" in "The International," Volume XII, Number 1. January 1918. Aside from the poetry fragments, the name Maud Allen, and her birth date and star sign are written on what is obviously the reverse of the page. Maud Allan (sometimes "Maud Allen", 1873 – 1956) was a dancer who was termed by a biographer "Canada's Isadora Duncan." She gained both fame and notoriety for her risque performance in a rendition of Oscar Wilde's play "Salome." Crowley was evidently much taken with Allan, and contributed a poem to a sort of handsomely-produced progamme entitled "Maud Allan and Her Art" (ca. 1916) which was sold at her performances. She is surprisingly absent from most biographical sources about Crowley, though the inclusion of her name in a list critiquing various women he had "been in love with" suggests an intimate acquaintance ("The Magical Record of the Beast 666," p. 138). He presumably acquired her birth details so that he could draw up her horoscope and this document may predate their acquaintance, as when given the opportunity, Crowley was in the habit of drawing up people's natal charts and studying them prior to a first meeting. Four heavy horizontal creases - probably from being folded into an envelope - quite dusty, with a number of small chips, tears and creases around the edges and tears starting at the edges of the creases. An interesting glimpse of Crowley the poet at work, seemingly jotting down lines, without particular plan, as they came to him. Item #68307

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